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treeposesarah:

Now this right here is some good stuff. Love her perspective as a researcher and a storyteller, both of which she seems to be incredibly gifted at being.

Brene’s TED talk. Good stuff

Joseph Campbell. His writings on semiotics, comparative religion and mythology (in particular ‘The Power of Myth’ and ‘The Hero With a Thousand Faces’) helped inspire the framework on which I built my character Robert Langdon. The PBS interview series with Joseph Campbell and Bill Moyers was hands down the most thought-provoking conversation I’ve ever witnessed. Campbell’s breadth of knowledge about the origins of religious belief enabled him to respond with clarity and logic to some very challenging questions about contradictions inherent in faith, religion, and scripture. I remember admiring Campbell’s matter-of-fact responses and wanting my own character Langdon to project that same respectful understanding when faced with complex spiritual issues.

Dan Brown, author of The Da Vinci Code, in response to being asked about the one writer he could meet, dead or alive, during an interview for The New York Times Sunday Book Review.

Of all the people he could meet, I must admit that I’m rather surprised to see it is JC.

~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

(via beingblog)

Need to find this bill moyers interview

beingblog:

From our senior editor trentgilliss:

"It will be a discipline before it becomes a pleasure."

This past month, I’ve been listening non-stop to Laura Mvula’s album Sing to the Moon. She’s an incredible singer who meshes hushed, contemplative lyrics with a verve and mastery that doesn’t feel like artifice or overly produced. Even her poppier songs are clean and refreshing. She’s her own woman, her own artist, who is comfortable in her own skin — for which I’m entirely thankful.

Brilliant on a Sunday night.

Beautiful

beingblog:

RIP Jim Ed Poole.
americanpublicmedia:


Our colleague the actor and sound-effects man Tom Keith died Sunday  night of a heart attack at his home in St. Paul. He performed on the  show October 22 at the Fitzgerald with the cast and guest John Lithgow —  played a zombie and a beery Elizabethan bartender, did the sound  effects for “Lives of the Cowboys” and “Mom” and did a wonderful and  shocking sound effect of a grade-school teacher being shrunk from six  feet to three inches, using a balloon, some small sticks, and vocal  thwops and splorts, and then did the voice of a three-inch-tall female.  He complained of shortness of breath the next week, but put off going to  see a doctor, and collapsed Sunday night around 6 p.m. He was conscious  afterward but died in the ambulance on his way to the hospital.

Tom Keith, 1946 - 2011

~reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Terrible

beingblog:

RIP Jim Ed Poole.

americanpublicmedia:

Our colleague the actor and sound-effects man Tom Keith died Sunday night of a heart attack at his home in St. Paul. He performed on the show October 22 at the Fitzgerald with the cast and guest John Lithgow — played a zombie and a beery Elizabethan bartender, did the sound effects for “Lives of the Cowboys” and “Mom” and did a wonderful and shocking sound effect of a grade-school teacher being shrunk from six feet to three inches, using a balloon, some small sticks, and vocal thwops and splorts, and then did the voice of a three-inch-tall female. He complained of shortness of breath the next week, but put off going to see a doctor, and collapsed Sunday night around 6 p.m. He was conscious afterward but died in the ambulance on his way to the hospital.

Tom Keith, 1946 - 2011

~reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Terrible

Santa Fe Sculptures

beingblog:

A Father Mourns His Lost Son
by Trent Gilliss, senior editor
Robert Peraza, who lost his son Robert David Peraza, pauses at his son’s name at the North Pool of the 9/11 Memorial during the tenth anniversary ceremonies at the site of the World Trade Center on September 11, 2011, in New York.
(photo: Justin Lane/AFP/Getty Images)

beingblog:

A Father Mourns His Lost Son

by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Robert Peraza, who lost his son Robert David Peraza, pauses at his son’s name at the North Pool of the 9/11 Memorial during the tenth anniversary ceremonies at the site of the World Trade Center on September 11, 2011, in New York.

(photo: Justin Lane/AFP/Getty Images)

You get to the point where you evolve in your life where everything isn’t black and white, good and bad, and you try to do the right thing. You might not like that. You might be very cynical about that. Well, f*** it, I don’t care what you think. I’m trying to do the right thing. I’m tired of Republican-Democrat politics. They can take the job and shove it. I come from a blue-collar background. I’m trying to do the right thing, and that’s where I’m going with this.

Supporters of same sex marriage demonstrate in Albany, New YorkNew York State Senator Roy McDonald

The Republican politician said this statement to reporters about his decision to support same-sex marriage legislation. McDonald was the 31st senator to support the Marriage Equality Act. McDonald is a Vietnam veteran and former steelworker. As a politician, he’s put his energy behind autism awareness and property tax cuts. Now he’s being heralded as a champion for civil rights.

About the image: Roger Minch Jr. of Troy, New York, the district that Roy McDonald represents, demonstrates his support of same sex marriage outside the New York Senate Chamber on June 17, 2011 in Albany, New York. Photo by Matthew Cavanaugh/Getty Images)

~Nancy Rosenbaum, producer

(via beingblog)
Philip Glass, performed by Aleck Karis - Mad Rush
1,094 playsDownload

beingblog:

Tuesday Evening Melody: Philip Glass “The Play of the Wrathful and Peaceful Deities”

by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

There’s no other composer quite like him. Philip Glass summons the inner strength — the power and majesty — and the vulnerable adult who is always a child inside. His music stirs something primal; he reminds of us of our vulnerability. His music compels us to remember how profound we all can be, even when we can’t feel or say one remarkable word.

I’ve been moved by “Mad Rush” on several occasions, but I had no idea of the back story until now. It was originally written for the organ, which I encourage you to listen to, but the reason it was written is just as interesting. Glass tells the story this way:

“In 1979, most of us didn’t really know very much about His Holiness the Dalai Lama. We weren’t sure exactly when he would arrive, though there was a time specified. I was asked to compose a piece of somewhat indefinite length. Not actually a problem for me. I played in the organ; I’ve become very comfortable with this as a piano piece.

It eventually acquired the name “Mad Rush,” which had nothing to do with its original purpose but… For those who are interested in the Tibetan iconography of Tibetan Buddhism, you might think of it as the play of the wrathful and peaceful deities.”

You can watch Glass’ performance of “Mad Rush” at the Garrison Institute on April 13, 2008 at the Cathedral Church of Saint John the Divine in New York City.

(Hats off to findout for reminding me of this exquisite piece!)